COVID Response: Plan of Action

Miracle Camp and Retreat Center – Revised 7-2-2020

All Policies are based on recommendations made by the American Camping Association (ACA) in conjunction with the Center for Disease Control (CDC)

 Document Outline:

  1. Communication Plan
  2. Health Screening Plan
  3. Preventing the Spread
  4. Cabins and Camp Facilities
  5. Activities and Programming
  6. Food Service
  7. Cleaning and Disinfection
  8. Transportation To and From Camp

 

  1. COMMUNICATION PLAN

 

PREPARATION

  • Miracle Camp has lined up one trusted medical professional to volunteer for each week of summer camp. This individual has passed a background check and will be counted on to be our primary contact for campers, parents/legal guardians, and staff. This designee will be prepared to effectively address any questions and concerns related to the COVID-19 pandemic and will be familiar with the policies and procedures MCRC has implemented.
  • Our local camp physician has signed off on our health office standing orders, and is aware of our camp schedule for the summer.
  • Contact has been made with our local Borgess Hospital Urgent Care and Emergency Room, as well as our local EMT response team. They are aware of the programs we are running this summer and the safety measures we are putting in place.
  • Wellspring in Schoolcraft has agreed to partner with us to provide medical assistance as well.
  • All staff have been made aware of the following policies and have been trained on how to implement them.
  • A plan of action will be made available for review by campers, parents, and the constituency of MCRC.
  • Signage from the CDC and WHO will be prepared and posted around campus to educate campers and staff on:
    • COVID-19 information
    • Handwashing
    • Cough etiquette
    • Symptoms associated with COVID-19
    • Stop the spread of germs
    • Physical distancing

 

COMMUNICATION PRIOR TO CAMP

  • Information regarding our health protocols will be emailed out to every camper and parent. Everyone will be asked to read and understand the measures that Miracle Camp is taking in response to the coronavirus.
    • All guests will sign a waiver acknowledging the potential liabilities (coronavirus or otherwise) involved in attending camp, and know that our campus is about 20 minutes from the nearest Emergency Room. We need everyone to make the best decision for them regarding their participation at Miracle Camp.
    • An FAQ page for parents will be made available for review on the MCRC website. The FAQ’s are a condensed version of the information contained in this response plan. We want to be transparent with the safety measures we are taking and give people the freedom to opt out based on their discretion. If parents ask to see this entire document, it can be made available upon request.
    • If campers have any pre-existing conditions or complications that make them “high risk,” we encourage them to consult with a trusted physician before deciding whether or not to attend Miracle Camp.
  • All staff and campers will be required to take self-quarantine protocols very seriously for the 14 days leading up to training. Self-monitoring and symptom screening will be necessary so that everyone can come to camp as safe and healthy as possible.
  • All campers and staff will be asked to bring a supply of (at least) 7 face masks.
  • All campers will be required to pass a health screening prior to coming to MCRC.

 

HEALTH SCREENING PRIOR TO CAMP

  • All campers will sign a waiver on their health screening questionnaire.
    • A pre-arrival agreement that states MCRC reserves the right not to admit a person who poses a communicable disease risk to others.
    • A pre-arrival agreement that campers will not hold MCRC liable if they suspect that they contracted a communicable disease here.
  • About three weeks before a camper’s arrival date, they will receive a scheduled email directing them to do a 14-day self-monitored health-screening (with the help of their parents).
    1. In the past 14 days have you had:
      • Fever (100.4 or greater)? (yes/no)
      • Shortness of Breath? (yes/no)
      • Cough? (yes/no)
      • Chills? (yes/no)
      • Repeated shaking with chills? (yes/no)
      • Muscle pain? (yes/no)
      • Headache? (yes/no)
      • Sore throat? (yes/no)
      • New loss of taste or smell? (yes/no)
    2. Have you been in close contact with a person with a known diagnosis of COVID-19, influenza, or any other communicable disease in the past 14 days?
    3. Have you traveled to an area with widespread or community-spread of COVID-19 in the past 14 days?
    4. Have you traveled out of the country or been in close contact with someone who has traveled out of the country in the past 14 days?
  • If a camper answers yes any of these questions, they will be directed to call the Miracle Camp office by Thursday before their child’s week of camp to discuss their child’s participation with a health officer. It is possible the camper will not be permitted to attend Miracle Camp due to potential risk of having a communicable disease.
    • In order for a participant to attend camp after suspected COVID-19 (symptoms of a respiratory infection – cough, sore throat, shortness of breath, fever), they must be fever-free without the use of fever-reducing medications and have improvement in respiratory symptoms; AND, at least 7 days have to have passed since the symptoms last appeared.
    • If the above case is not true by the time the camper’s session is scheduled to begin, the participant is not permitted to attend MCRC due to the potential risk of spreading a communicable disease.

 

COMMUNICATION DURING CAMP

  • Upon arrival, we will communicate and demonstrate to all campers what safety measures they need to take to avoid spreading COVID-19 at camp. We will do this from stage. This includes:
    • How and when to effectively wash and sanitize hands. We will take this so seriously.
    • How to practice physical distancing in various settings (dining hall, cabins, chapel, etc.)
    • Which symptoms to look out for and when to report them and to whom
    • Coughing etiquette
    • Other camp-specific program modifications
    • Signage from the CDC will be posted in cabins and other key areas to remind campers about these things.
  • Cabin leaders will ensure campers that they can talk about how they are feeling while they are at camp and it is okay to admit if they are feeling sick. We will encourage campers to open up with questions they might have, and our staff will respond by being calm, reassuring, and comforting.
  • Nobody should answer questions concerning coronavirus that they don’t have answers to. It’s okay to say “I don’t know” and seek out more information. Refer to health professionals when in doubt to avoid spreading misinformation.
  • Cabin leaders will speak in age-appropriate language:
    • Early elementary school aged children: Provide brief, simple information that balances COVID-19 facts with appropriate reassurances that adults are there to help keep them healthy and to take care of them if they do get sick. Give simple examples of the steps they make every day to stop germs and stay healthy, such as washing hands. Use language such as “Adults are working hard to keep you safe.”
    • Upper elementary and early middle school aged children: This age group often is more vocal in asking questions about whether they indeed are safe and what will happen if COVID-19 spreads in their area. They may need assistance separating reality from rumor and fantasy. Discuss the efforts national, state, and community leaders are making to prevent germs from spreading and keep people healthy.
    • Upper middle and high school aged children: With this age group, issues can be discussed in more depth. Refer them to appropriate sources of COVID-19 facts. Provide honest, accurate, and factual information about the current status of COVID- 19.
  • Parents will be notified if any campers from their child’s cohort have a suspected or case of COVID-19.
  • All parents will be notified if a child with a confirmed case of COVID-19 was at their week of camp.
  • Parents will be notified immediately if their child is exhibiting a fever over 100.4ºF, or other “red-flag” symptoms. In this case, the parent/guardian will need to come pick up their child immediately.
    • We will have zero-tolerance for symptoms such as a fever over 100.4, but symptoms such as an upset stomach will require further monitoring before the health team would make an official call on whether a camper could continue to stay at camp. An upset stomach could be due to a number of factors, such as homesickness.
    • Even in the case of a fever over 100.4, a camper will be put in a cool isolation place and their temperature will be taken again about 15-20 minutes later.
  • Local health officials will be notified immediately of any suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19.
    • MCRC administrators will seek guidance from health officials and experts in this case and defer totally to their authority if/when a camp session might need to end early, and if/when the camp might be allowed to reopen. In this case, parents/guardians will be contacted immediately.
    • Local Health District: Van Buren Cass District Health Department
    • 302 S Front St, Dowagiac, MI 49047
    • Phone: (269) 782-0064 – Attn: Brian Lint

 

  1. HEALTH SCREENING PLAN

 

PRE-CAMP SCREENING

  • About three weeks before a camper’s arrival date, they will receive an automated email directing them to follow these directions and answer some questions.
  • Other temporary staff and volunteers that rotate throughout the summer (such as speakers, health officers, and their families), will also be required to pre-screen before their stay at camp and before they’d interact with any campers.
    • Do the following for the 14 days prior to your scheduled arrival:
      • Self-quarantine from others outside of your family as is feasible and take reasonable precautions.
      • Take and record the camper’s temperature every day for the 14 days immediately before they are scheduled to come to camp.
      • Note and keep record of any of the following symptoms: fever of 100.4°F or greater, cough, shortness of breath, diarrhea, fatigue, headache, muscle aches, nausea, loss of taste or smell, sore throat, vomiting, etc.
    • Answer these questions before travelling up to camp:
  1. In the past 14 days have you had:
    • Fever (100 or greater)? (yes/no)
    • Shortness of Breath? (yes/no)
    • Cough? (yes/no)
    • Chills? (yes/no)
    • Repeated shaking with chills? (yes/no)
    • Muscle pain? (yes/no)
    • Headache? (yes/no)
    • Sore throat? (yes/no)
    • New loss of taste or smell? (yes/no)
  2. Have you been in close contact with a person with a known diagnosis of COVID-19, influenza, or any other communicable disease in the past 14 days?
  3. Have you traveled to an area with widespread or community-spread of COVID-19 in the past 14 days?
  4. Have you traveled out of the country or been in close contact with someone who has traveled out of the country in the past 14 days?
  • If a participant answers yes any of these questions, they will be directed to call the Miracle Camp office by Thursday before their child’s week of camp to discuss their child’s participation with a health officer. It is possible the camper will not be permitted to attend Miracle Camp due to potential risk of having a communicable disease.
    • In order for a participant to attend camp after suspected COVID-19 (symptoms of a respiratory infection – cough, sore throat, shortness of breath, fever), they must be fever-free without the use of fever-reducing medications and have improvement in respiratory symptoms; AND, at least 7 days have to have passed since the symptoms last appeared.
    • If the above case is not true by the time the camper’s session is scheduled to begin, the participant is not permitted to attend MCRC due to the potential risk of spreading a communicable disease.

 

ON-ARRIVAL SCREENING

  • All campers will turn in their pre-screening information immediately upon their arrival to camp.
  • Campers travelling up on a bus will be screened in the church parking lot prior to boarding the bus.
  • Campers travelling up in smaller vehicles will be screened on-site prior to moving into their cabin.
  • For more details, see Section 8: Transportation To and From Camp

 

ON-GOING SCREENING DURING CAMP

  • The CDC does not recommend a standard time interval for how often staff/campers must be screened. It is up to our discretion.
    • We will begin the summer by screening staff every Sunday before every new session of campers (weekly). We may increase that frequency as the summer goes on.
    • We will do an initial health screening for all campers on arrival, but because we are an overnight camp (not a day camp), daily re-screenings are not required. We may increase this frequency as the summer goes on.
    • Campers will only be screened during the camp session if we suspect they are at risk of having contracted the coronavirus (they exhibit symptoms).
  • Regular weekly staff screenings will consist of the following:
    • Ask the individual if they have any COVID-19 symptoms: fever of 100.4°F or greater, cough, shortness of breath, diarrhea, fatigue, headache, muscle aches, nausea, loss of taste or smell, sore throat, vomiting, etc.
    • Signage and daily staff meetings will encourage staff to self-report their symptoms even outside of the normal weekly health screening.
    • Temperature checks will take place using a temporal thermometer. The thermometer will be cleaned with an alcohol wipe (or isopropyl alcohol on a cotton swab) between each individual.
    • If staff is suspected to have COVID-19 based on this assessment, we will place a face mask or cloth face covering on the individual. We will isolate the individual by putting them in a quarantine room. The area for individuals with symptoms should be at least 6 feet away from other areas of the health center or in a separate room. Health staff should wear a face mask, a face shield or other eye protection, disposable gloves, and a disposable gown (if conducting aerosol generating procedures) while working with individuals who have a suspected case of COVID-19.
    • If the health team suspects a staff member has a case of COVID-19, they will follow the MCRC “Response and Management of Case(s) or Probable Case(s)” protocol (below).
    • They will contact camp administrators if a staff member is suspected of having COVID-19 and alternative arrangements will be made to cover that staff member’s responsibilities until further notice.
  • Full time staff are required to keep a daily health screening log, and part time staff are required to answer screening questions every time they clock in to work.

 

RESPONSE AND MANAGEMENT OF CASE(S) OR PROBABLE CASE(S)

If a staff member or camper is identified as having a potential or confirmed case of COVID-19, isolate the individual in a designated sick room. Follow protocols outlined in the CDP and consider the following:

  • Consider if a camper or staff member warrants further clinical evaluation, and if so, make arrangements to do so.
  • If camper or staff member does not require immediate clinical evaluation, and if CDP calls for the individual to return home, isolate the individual until appropriate return to home transportation can be arranged.
  • There is no case in which a camper will remain isolated on campus if they are suspected of having a case of COVID-19.
    • If a staff member is suspected of having a case of COVID-19, the medical team will:
      • Move the staff member to a quarantine room
      • Clean the person’s sleeping area
      • Look into testing availability and make arrangements to be tested
      • If the staff member turns out to have a confirmed positive case of COVID-19, we will make arrangements for them to self-quarantine at home for at least 14 days

It is crucial to carry out “contact tracing” immediately to determine the potential or confirmed case’s contacts with other campers or staff members over the previous two or more days.

Assessing and informing those with potential exposure is a fundamental control strategy for minimizing spread within a group or camp population. CDC defines close contact as interactions within 6 feet for more than 15 minutes. Contact tracing should be carried out by trained staff (e.g., public health staff, community health workers, trained volunteers) in conjunction with the local health department. However, camp health staff can utilize general principles of contact tracing to begin closely monitoring other potentially exposed individuals. For our overnight camp, campers and staff within the “cohort/household” or cabin of the index case should have enhanced surveillance for symptoms and we will consider mitigation measures including minimizing this group’s exposures to other cabins. This could include separate programing, dining, and wash times.

The link below provides CDC basic principles of contact tracing to reduce the spread of COVID- 19 transmission.

COVID-19 Contact Tracing Training: Guidance, Resources, and Sample Training Plan

 

 

  1. PREVENTING THE SPREAD

 

COMMUNICATION FROM ADMINISTRATION

  • We will post CDC-informed print material in bathrooms to remind staff and campers when and how to wash hands.
  • We will incorporate CDC-informed material into a video or life staff demonstration showing campers how to wash hands.
  • We will post print materials informed by the CDC in critical areas where physical distancing should be encouraged: dining hall, common areas, cabins, etc.

 

HAND HYGIENE — CAMPERS AND GENERAL STAFF

When to Wash or Disinfect Hands

  • Before eating food (before entering the dining area)
  • Upon entering the cabin
  • After being in contact with someone who may have been sick
  • After touching frequently touched surface (railings, doorknobs, counters, etc.)
  • After using the restroom
  • After using common items, such as sports equipment, craft supplies, etc.
  • After coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose

 

Modifiers to Normal Handwashing Practice

  • Additional hand washing stations will be set up around camp to increase accessibility, especially in high-traffic areas that are distant from cabins.
    • Multiple handwashing stations will be set up in or near the gathering area so every diner can wash their hands before entering the dining hall.
    • Handwashing stations will be set up near Razz Field and the Climbing Tower/Zipline.
  • Some handwashing or sanitizing stations will set up outside of common bathrooms to ensure that every camper cleans their hands after exiting the bathrooms.
    • This is especially important in the Dining Hall and Chapel.
    • It is recommended that a staff member monitors the bathroom doors and washing/sanitizing stations to make sure that every camper does in fact clean their hands after the leaving the bathroom.

 

HAND HYGIENE — KITCHEN AND DINING HALL STAFF

When to Wash Hands

Existing best practices for food preparation apply. Coronavirus is not foodborne, but food service workers who are infected can transmit the virus to coworkers or diners. Handwashing is equally important whether gloves are used or not and all recommendations apply regardless of glove use.

  • Before and after using gloves
  • Before, during, and after preparing any food
  • After handling raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs
  • After touching garbage
  • After using the restroom
  • After wiping counters or cleaning other surfaces with chemicals
  • After coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose
  • Before and after breaks

 

HOW TO WASH HANDS

  1. Wet your hands with clean, running water. Turn off the tap and apply soap.
  2. Lather your hands by running them together with the soap. Make sure to lather the back of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  3. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds (about the time it takes to sing the “Happy
  4. Birthday” song twice.)
  5. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  6. Dry your hands using a clean towel or an air dryer.

You may use paper towels to turn off the faucet and/or open doors of the bathrooms.

 

HOW TO USE ALCOHOL-BASED HAND SANITIZER

Hand sanitizers should contain greater than 60% ethanol or greater than 70% isopropanol. Hand sanitizers are not a substitute for handwashing for kitchen and dining staff.

  1. Apply the product to the palm of one hand.
  2. Rub your hands together. Make sure the product contacts the back of your hands, palms, between your fingers, and fingertips.
  3. Continue to rub your hands together until your hands are dry (about 20 seconds).

 

HANDWASHING MISCONCEPTIONS

  • Water temperature is not important. Cold and warm water work equally well as long as the water is clean.
  • Antibacterial soap is not more effective than regular soap.
  • Bar soap and liquid soap are equally effective.
  • Soap and water are more effective than alcohol-based hand sanitizer if hands are visibly dirty or greasy.
  • If water is available but soap and hand sanitizer are not, rubbing your hands together under water and drying them off with a clean towel or letting them air dry can remove some germs. Only use this method as a last resort.

 

PHYSICAL DISTANCING

Physical distancing is also known as “social distancing.” Physical distancing can allow individuals to safely interact with others. Physical distancing is not a substitute for using cohorts, a method of isolating groups that can be integrated over time if conditions are met.

For camps, the CDC encourages physical distancing through increased spacing, small groups, and limited mixing between groups, and staggered scheduling, arrival, and drop off, when possible.

 

  1. CABINS AND CAMP FACILITIES

 

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

The Miracle Camp Operations Team will consult the CDC recommendations for maintenance protocols regarding building plumbing, ventilation, etc.

 

HOUSING

  • Staff and campers alike will remain assigned to the same cabin throughout the camp session. Nobody will not rotate between cabins.
  • Cabin access will be primarily limited to the staff and campers assigned to the cabin. Parents or other visitors will not be allowed inside cabins on arrival or departure days.
    • Some exceptions may be made for the camp medical team, maintenance staff, inspectors, or camp administrators.
  • The camper capacity for each cabin will be limited to 10 campers in order to aide in physical distancing.
    • This limit will be in effect for the first week(s) of camp, and may increase throughout the summer (as government and/or CDC recommendations allow).
  • All cabin residents should use hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol or wash their hands with soap and water, for at least 20 seconds, upon entry to their cabin.
  • Campers will avoid sharing items (cups, clothes, food, pillows/bedding, etc.) with cabin mates.
  • Cabins will be cleaned daily.
  • Personal belongings should be limited to essential items plus a limited number of non-essential items.
  • Campers should keep personal belongings organized and separate from other campers’ belongings.
  • Signage will be posted in cabins reminding staff and campers of ways to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

 

BATHROOM

  • Avoid sharing common bathroom supplies (towels, soap, toothpaste, etc.). Campers should bring their own bathroom supplies and a container for toiletries to be stored in for the duration of camp.
  • Campers should keep personal items in their bag or tote and store their bag or tote near their sleeping area (not in the bathroom).
  • Keep soap, toilet paper, and paper towels in the bathroom stocked at all times.
  • Cabin leaders will create a staggered shower schedule and limit the number of people using the facilities at one time.
  • Trash cans will be placed near the exit of the restrooms to make it easier to discard items. All trash cans on campus should have no lids, or a lid activated by a foot pedal, in order to allow for contact-less disposals.
  • The Handwashing sign from the CDC will be posted in the bathroom to remind campers and staff when and how to properly wash hands.

 

SLEEPING

  • As much as possible, we will create at least six feet of space between beds. If utilizing head-to-toe orientation, four feet of space between beds is acceptable.
  • We will position sleepers head-to-toe or toe-to-toe to maximize distance between heads/faces:
    • For bunk beds, position the head of the camper in the top bunk opposite the position of the camper in the bottom bunk.
    • For side-by-side beds, position the head of the camper in one bed opposite the position of the camper in the adjacent bunk.
    • For end-to-end beds, position the toes of each camper close to the other camper’s toes.
  • If a distance of four-to-six feet cannot be created between beds, create physical barriers between sleepers, using curtains or sheets.
  • Campers and staff are encouraged to use bedding that can be washed and dried in a mechanical air dryer. Keep each camper’s bedding separate.

 

RETAIL LOCATIONS — CAMP STORE, CRAFT SHACK, COFFEE SHOP

  • Use of these retail locations will be limited to one cohort at a time.
  • All normal social distancing practices will apply.
  • Campers must wash or sanitize hands before entering and after exiting.
  • Regular cleaning and disinfecting will take place daily and also between cohorts.

 

  1. ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMMING

 

ADMINISTRATIVE

General Guidance

  • All campers will be grouped by the cabin they are living with. This will be considered a “family unit” for the week. All activities will be structured and scheduled by cabin to keep campers together in the same group all week.
  • Cabins that are located in the same building will be considered a larger “cohort” and may do some activities together.
    • A cohort will never surpass the Michigan state guidelines. Most cohorts will consist of 40 campers and 8 staff.
    • Some activities that involve multiple cohorts may take place, but only with the approval of the medical team. In any case, these activities must be outdoors and no physical touching between cohorts is allowed.
    • Cohort groups should maintain physical distancing at activities.
    • For example, four cohorts could do relay races in a field as long as they were spaced apart adequately and did not share any equipment.
  • While cabins are doing activities and going about the normal camp schedule as a family unit, wearing facemasks are not required.
    • Some activities taking place within a cohort may require facemasks to be worn, but not all.
    • Staff who are running an activity with multiple cohorts cycling through throughout the day should stay 6 feet away as much as possible and prefer outdoor spaces. If it is not possible to be outside or maintain 6 feet of distance, then they must wear a facemask when guests are present.
  • A representative from the medical team will be in key meetings where camp programming is discussed. This staff member will give counsel and feedback on how to run activities and games safely. The medical team has the authority to veto or modify any proposed programming.
  • Holding activities outdoors as much as possible is recommended.
  • Ensure campers and staff practice proper hand hygiene:
    • We will instruct campers to wash hands with soap and water for 20 seconds before and after activities, or
    • Provide alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol before and after activities.
    • Multiple temporary handwashing stations will be set up in key activity areas to make handwashing more accessible.
  • All shared items and equipment (e.g., bows and arrows, oars, art supplies) will be properly cleaned and disinfected between use of cohorts.
  • If feasible, shared equipment should be limited to items that can be effectively cleaned (e.g., sports equipment with hard, non-porous handles are preferred to those with soft, porous handles).
  • Extra time will be scheduled before/after some activities to allow for them to be properly cleaned before the next cabin or cohort arrives.
  • Campers should use disposable cups or personal water bottles for drinking water. Igloos will be strategically placed around camp and will always be preferred over shared drinking fountains. Staff should disinfect any water spigots between group use.

 

INDOOR SPACES

Gym

  • Indoor spaces such as the gym will be limited to use by one cohort at a time.
  • Campers must wash or sanitize their hands every time they enter or exit the gym.
  • We will make efforts to increase ventilation inside the gym such as turning on fans and opening up doors.
  • Gym and game room equipment must be disinfected between every cohort.

 

The Chapel Meeting Area and Cabin Meeting Areas

  • In the case of inclement weather, each cohort will be assigned one indoor location. These spaces will remain consistent throughout the whole summer.
    • Judson: Chapel
    • Woodlands: Woodlands Lobby
    • Evergreen: Evergreen Lobby
    • Hickory/Maple Ridge: Gym
  • These indoor spaces may be used by the cohorts of 40 campers (less than 50 people) to do alterative chapel programming or group games.

 

WATERFRONT

According to the CDC, the coronavirus is not waterborne. There is no current evidence that COVID-19 can be spread to people through water: this includes drinking water, recreational water, and wastewater. The risk of COVID-19 transmission through water is expected to be low. However, we will still practice safe physical distancing and proper hygiene practices at the waterfront.

  • We will ensure campers and staff practice proper hand hygiene prior to entering and exiting the waterfront:
    • Campers and staff will wash hands with soap and water in the outer Evergreen bathrooms (or portable wash stations) for 20 seconds before and after swimming, or
    • They will use alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol before and after swimming.
  • We will maintain adequate staff to ensure camper safety. Efforts to maintain physical distancing will not impact existing camp safety protocols.
  • As much as possible, campers will enjoy waterfront activities in cabin groups or with others in their cohort. There is no designated common changing or showering area that will be used by multiple cabins. Everyone will get ready in their own cabin area.
  • The lifeguard staff will clean and prepare the waterfront as normal before and after every day of camp, according to what is standard.
  • Lifeguards will pay special attention to clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and shared equipment.
    • Shared equipment will be limited to items that can be effectively cleaned (things with non-porous surfaces such as paddles).
    • Shared equipment will be cleaned between uses of cohorts.
    • Personal lifejackets should never be shared between campers. Lifejackets will be disinfected between every cohort use.
  • Safety protocols such as the swim test and buddy system will remain in effect as normal. Campers should only be assigned to a buddy within their cabin or cohort.

 

CABIN AND COHORT GROUPINGS

  • Campers will be organized by the cabins they sleep in and will be considered a “family unit” together with their cabin leader(s).
    • Campers and staff will remain in the same consistent cabin for an entire session of camp.
  • Cabins within the same building will be considered a “cohort” and may do some additional activities together.
    • We are planning to operate according to the following 4 cohorts:
      • Evergreen
      • Judson
      • Woodlands
      • Hickory & Maple Ridge
    • When camp is operating at the maximum number of participants (10 people per cabin), there will be a maximum of about 40 campers per cohort.
  • During times when multiple cohorts are present (i.e. outdoor chapel), physical and social distancing guidelines will be followed. These types of gatherings will always be outdoors.
  • Parents, guardians, and other visitors to camp who do not belong to a cohort will be not be allowed in cabins and will be required to maintain social distancing.
  • Other cohorts will be designated among other staff groupings such as camp aides, kitchen staff, program office, health office staff, activities staff, office administration staff, operations staff, etc.
    • Cohorts should use discretion when inter-mixing, and should always practice proper physical distancing.
    • Facemasks will be required when proper social distancing cannot be maintained.
  • Staff, volunteers, or service workers who frequently leave campus to be involved in the community should not be assigned to a cohort and should always wear a mask and practice physical distancing when they are near others.
    • (i.e. a guest speaker from the area who is driving into camp every day to speak should wear a mask when he is near others indoors)
    • Speakers do not need to wear a mask while they are teaching.

 

 

  1. FOOD SERVICE

 

ADMINISTRATION

Policy

  • Employees will be instructed to report any COVID-19 symptoms to their supervisors.
  • If employees report respiratory illness symptoms, they will be instructed to stay home.
  • If an employee reports symptoms during work, they will be sent home immediately.
    • Their workstation will be cleaned and disinfected (which may include the entire kitchen), and we will consider employees within their vicinity potentially exposed. We will implement next steps from the MCRC communicable disease plan (CDP).
    • If an employee is confirmed to have COVID-19, we will inform employees of their potential exposure while maintaining confidentiality. We will implement next steps from the MCRC CDP.
  • We will actively encourage and require sick employees to stay home.

 

Planning and Preparation

  • We will maintain our inventory of qualified and licensed staff to fill critical food service positions.
  • We will stock disposable gloves, facemasks, and cleaning supplies. They will be reordered regularly.
    • We will provide staff with access to soap and clean running water, disposable gloves, and facemasks.
  • Staff will be trained on proper hand washing and control procedures implemented by the camp.
  • Staff will be provided with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved disinfectants for custodial tasks.

 

 

Operations and Configuration

  • Food service employees will be directed to assess their symptoms prior to starting work each day.
  • Cabins and tables will be spaced out in the dining area as much as possible. Where possible, cabins will leave an empty table between each other.
    • Specific tables will be assigned to each cabin and cohort. These table assignments will remain the same throughout the entire summer.
    • In general, we aim to decrease the occupancy density by about half. We will set a reasonable occupancy limit (decreasing from 29 tables to 14).
    • When needed, we will stagger cabins across multiple meal times in an expanded window in order to decrease the number of diners in the dining area at a time. In this case, the dining area will be cleaned between meal times.
    • When the weather allows, we will also encourage and make available the picnic tables outside the dining hall.
    • If needed, we are prepared to utilize alternative outdoor spaces for eating if we serve grab-n-go style meals.
  • The food service lines will no longer be self-serve buffet style in order to prevent the use of shared utensils. Staff members will be positioned along the service line to serve ever camper “cafeteria style.”
  • Cohorts will be assigned a specific arrival time for their meal time so that multiple cohorts are not waiting in line at the same time.
  • Campers must either wash their hands with soap and water using the gathering room wash station (preferred), wash in the dining hall bathrooms, or use hand sanitizer dispensers located at the entrance of the dining hall.
  • All garbage cans will remain open (with no lids) to ensure that campers can throw away waste without touching anything.
  • No personal water bottles should be refilled in the kitchen area. Diners should use camp-supplied glasses/cups for beverages and receive a new glass/cup for water if a refill is desired.
    • Water bottles can be refilled with the water pitchers available on each table.
  • We will remove decorative objects, flyers, and materials from tables and counters to allow for effective cleaning and sanitation.
  • We will discontinue the use of shared condiment dispensers. We will offer single-serve condiment packets or small containers alongside the prepared meal.
  • One staff member will be assigned to operate the beverage dispensers (fountain drink dispensers and milk cooler). We will arrange cups of beverage choices along a table or counter for diners to retrieve. A pitcher of water will be placed on each table prior to each meal.

 

FOOD SERVICE WORKERS

 

Prior to Work (Suggested Best Practices)

  • Shower or bathe before coming to work.
  • Trim and file fingernails. Remove nail polish or false nails.
  • Wear clean clothes or clean work uniform.
  • Wear appropriate and clean footwear

 

General Guidelines

  • Do not work if you are sick or showing flu-like symptoms.
  • Wear disposable gloves and avoid direct barehand contact with food.
  • Do not wear watches, bracelets, or rings.
  • Wear a facemask or cloth face covering.
  • Wear disposable gowns and/or an apron when possible.
  • Maintain a physical distance and increased spacing from other food preparation workers whenever possible.
  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before and after work and breaks; after using the bathroom, blowing your nose, coughing, sneezing, or touching frequently touched surfaces; and before preparing food.
  • Best practice: food preparation staff use a fingernail brush during handwashing.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, throw it away, and wash your hands immediately.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.

 

Food Preparation

  • Existing best practices for food preparation and storage apply. Coronavirus is not foodborne, but food service workers who are infected can transmit the virus to coworkers or diners.
  • Follow the four key steps to food safety: Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill.
  • Best practice: Even while wearing gloves, use clean utensils, such as tongs, spoons, etc., instead of gloved hands to prepare food as much as possible.

 

Cleaning and Disinfecting Food Contact Surfaces

  • Use soap or detergent and water to wash food contact surfaces (i.e., dishware, utensils, trays, food preparation surfaces, beverage equipment) then rinse after use.
  • Best practice: Disinfect food contact surfaces before food preparation.
  • Ensure any disinfectants used appear on “EPA’s Registered Antimicrobial Products for Use Against Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2″ and are safe for food contact surfaces. Follow manufacturer instructions.
  • Let dishware and equipment airdry; do not dry with towels.
  • Ensure that dishwasher machines are operating within the manufacturer’s specifications and that appropriate water temperatures, detergents, and sanitizers are being used.

 

Cleaning and Disinfecting Non-Food Contact Surfaces

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched non-food contact surfaces in the kitchen and dining area at least daily. Best practice: Clean and disinfect the dining area before and after each use.
  • Clean and disinfect non-food contact surfaces in the kitchen and dining area’s commonly touched surfaces (e.g., counters, tables, chairs, coffee pot handles) daily. Best practice: Clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces before and after each use.
  • If hard non-porous surfaces are visibly dirty, clean them with detergent or soap and water before disinfecting.
  • Disinfect hard non-porous surfaces using:
    • “EPA’s Registered Antimicrobial Products for Use Against Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.”
    • Diluted household bleach products. Add 5 tablespoons (1/3 cup) of bleach to a gallon of water or 4 teaspoons of bleach to a quart of water. Do not use in conjunction with ammonia-based solutions. Mix a new bleach-based solution each day, when the liquid has debris in it, and when the solutions parts per million fall below state guidelines.
    • Alcohol-based solutions containing at least 70% alcohol.
  • If still in use, clean and disinfect condiment dispensers as frequently as practicable.
  • If soft or porous surfaces (e.g., fabric seats, upholstery) are visibly dirty, clean them using appropriate cleaners.
  • Disinfect soft or porous surfaces using “EPA’s Registered Antimicrobial Products for Use
  • Against Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.”
  • If frequently touched electronic surfaces (e.g., equipment controls, lights) are visibly dirty, clean them using products appropriate for use on electronics.
  • Disinfect electronic surfaces according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. If none exist, use alcohol-based solutions containing at least 70% alcohol.
  • Remove and dispose of gloves, facemasks, and gowns/aprons (if applicable) immediately after cleaning and disinfecting or when visibly soiled.
  • Immediately after cleaning and disinfecting (and before taking breaks), wash hands using soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If a handwashing station is not available, disinfect hands using alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • If disposable gowns are not worn, immediately launder clothes (or uniform) worn using the warmest appropriate water and dry completely. Wash hands immediately after handling dirty laundry.
  • For more information, follow CDC guidance on cleaning and disinfecting.

 

DINERS

  • Campers and staff should not attend meals if they are sick or experiencing flu-like symptoms. Instead, they should immediately and go to the Health Office.
  • All diners must wash hands with soap and water for 20 seconds or use alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol upon entry to the dining area.
  • Avoid touching frequently touched surfaces such as handles, doorknobs, tables, and counters as much as possible.
  • When retrieving food, avoid touching items. Instead, wait for a staff member to serve you.
  • Maintain physical distance and increased spacing between yourself and others whenever possible.
  • Everyone will sit with their same cabin each meal.
  • When the weather permits, campers may eat outside at the picnic tables or in areas with less people.
  • When in line, everyone must maintain physical distance between other individuals, and especially other cohorts.
  • Everyone must cover their cough or sneeze with good cough and sneeze etiquette. If a tissue or napkin is used it should be thrown away, and hands should be washed immediately.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Use utensils rather than hands to eat as much as possible, even when eating traditional “finger foods.”

 

  1. CLEANING AND DISINFECTION PROCEDURES

 

  • Communal spaces will be cleaned by housekeeping and/or hospitality staff on a daily basis. Certain high-traffic areas will be cleaned multiple times a day — between cohorts.
  • Shared items and activities will be cleaned daily at a minimum, and also between cohorts.
  • Special attention will be paid to frequently touched surfaces such as tables, door handles, hand railings, light switches, countertops, cabinet handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks. Any other surfaces frequently touched by campers or staff should be cleaned and disinfected at least daily or, preferably, several times per day.
  • Communal drinking fountains will not be used this summer. As an alternative, water will be served from various igloos stationed around camp. Campers will be instructed to get the help of a cabin leader or other staff member to get a drink, and nozzles should always be disinfected between groups. Campers should only drink from disposable cups or personal water bottles.
    • Cabin leaders will be encouraged to use tape or labels to write camper names and cabins on campers’ water bottles.
  • Cleaning of outdoor structures made of plastic or metal will be carried out according to typical cleaning practices. More frequent cleaning of high touch outdoor surfaces, such as grab bars or railings, is recommended. Outdoor wooden surfaces, such as high adventure structures or benches, can be cleaned according to standard camp practices and more frequently if needed to remove obvious soiling.
  • Toilets, showers, and restrooms will be cleaned daily at a minimum. As much as possible, campers are encouraged to use the restrooms in their own cabins as opposed to ones in common areas.

 

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) FOR CLEANING STAFF

  • For all routine daily cleanings, gloves and facemasks are required.
  • Gowns/aprons are stocked and available for staff use, but not required for routine cleanings.
    • In cases of suspected COVID-19, gowns/aprons and protective eyewear are required in addition to gloves and facemasks.
  • All cleaning solutions will be prepared within the guidelines of what is permissible according to the CDC.
    • Eye protection and gloves must be worn when preparing cleaning solutions, including dilute bleach solutions. Gowns/aprons are stocked and available, but optional.
  • When finished, all cleaning staff must remove gowns/aprons first, being careful not to contaminate the surrounding area. Next gloves are to be removed by grasping from the inside and peeling inside out. Hands must be thoroughly washed for at least 20 seconds using soap and water. If soap and water are not available and hands are not visibly dirty, an alcohol- based hand sanitizer that contains 60%-95% alcohol may be used. However, if hands are visibly dirty, always wash hands with soap and water.

 

WHAT WE WILL DO IF THERE IS A CONFIRMED OR PROBABLE CASE OF COVID-19

If more than 7 days have passed since the person who is sick visited or used the facility, additional cleaning and disinfection is not necessary. Continue routine cleaning and disinfection. If less than 7 days, close off areas that were used by the person who is sick and carry out the following:

  • Open outside doors and windows to increase air circulation in the areas, if possible.
  • Wait up to 24 hours or as long as practical before you clean or disinfect the space to allow respiratory droplets to settle before cleaning and disinfecting. Outdoor venues and equipment could be cleaned without delay.
  • Clean and disinfect all areas used by the person who is sick. Run ventilation system during cleaning.
    • Use dedicated cleaning and disinfecting materials to disinfect a potential source area (e.g., an infected camper’s cabin or bunk area). The cleaning equipment should not be used to clean other areas until they are thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.
  • Enhanced cleaning is recommended if it is determined that a person with COVID-19 was present in a building (e.g., dining hall, gym, bunk, etc.) or at camp activity areas for at least 15 minutes.

 

For a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 case, the following enhanced cleaning protocol should be followed:

  • First clean visibly dirty surfaces then perform disinfection. Products that are specific to coronavirus, have an “emerging viral pathogen” claim, and require less than 1 minute of contact time are preferred. Make sure products have not passed their expiration date.
  • Use disposable wipes/paper towels to clean surfaces if possible, rather than reusable cloth wipes, as the latter can re-contaminate surfaces. All cleaning and disinfecting materials (e.g., paper towels, cloth wipers, sponges, mop heads, etc.) should be disposed in sealed bags or containers after use.
  • In each area, pay particular attention to high touch areas, including, but not limited to, handrails, door handles, cabinet and drawer handles, shared sports equipment or craft tools.
  • Clean and disinfect an area extending 12 feet in all directions around the camper’s sleeping quarters, focusing on all horizontal surfaces and high touch objects. Clean and disinfect areas identified as locations visited by the individual who is sick or that the individual used or occupied, including the entire bathroom and any common or activities areas. These include high touch objects in common areas including handrails, exterior door entry handles, cabinet handles, and restroom door handles, as well as crafting tools or sports equipment.
  • Use dedicated cleaning and disinfecting materials to disinfect a potential source area. These materials should not be used to clean other areas until they are thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.
  • Clean a potential source area by progressing from the entrance to the most distant point to avoid re-contaminating surfaces that have been disinfected (i.e., clean your way out).
  • Clean soft and porous surfaces such as carpeted floor, rugs, and drapes also using the procedure noted above for porous surfaces. NOTE: If some porous surfaces are not suitable for cleaning with disinfectants, then clean them as much as possible and attach a sign to them saying they are not to be used or touched for three days.

 

IF A CASE OF COVID-19 IS CONFIRMED OR PROBABLE, INCREASED PPE MEASURES WILL BE FOLLOWED:

  • Cleaning staff should wear eye protection, disposable gloves, facemask, and gowns/aprons for all tasks in the enhanced cleaning process, including handling trash.
  • Gloves and gowns/aprons should be compatible with the disinfectant products being used.
  • Facemask should be disposable and used for the enhanced cleaning only.
  • Additional PPE might be required based on the cleaning/disinfectant products being used and whether there is a risk of splash, for example a face shield.
  • Gloves and gowns/aprons should be removed carefully to avoid contamination of the wearer and the surrounding area. Be sure to clean hands after removing gloves.
  • Gloves should be removed after cleaning a room or area occupied by ill persons. Clean hands immediately after gloves are removed.
  • Cleaning staff should immediately report breaches in PPE (e.g., tear in gloves) or any potential exposures to their supervisor.
  • Cleaning staff and others should clean hands often, including immediately after removing gloves and after contact with an ill person, by washing hands with soap and water for 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available and hands are not visibly dirty, an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60%-95% alcohol may be used. However, if hands are visibly dirty, always wash hands with soap and water.

 

  1. TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM CAMP

 

ADMINISTRATION

Camper Drop-Off

  • Campers will be encouraged to stick to a specific assigned drop-off time so that arrivals can be staggered as much as possible. This will vastly improve the flow of camper registration.
  • Staff will be positioned at the entrance of camp to provide direction as campers arrive.
  • A health officer will be stationed at the outdoor basketball court to do a health screening on every person who enters the camp property.
    • Campers must turn in their questionnaires for review at this point.
    • Campers, parents, and anyone in the car will get their temperature taken right upon arrival. If anyone in the car records a temperature over 100.4:
      • Arrangements will be made to move the person to an air conditioned area for 15-20 minutes before their temperature will be rechecked.
      • During the waiting period, no one in the car will be allowed to get out of the vehicle.
      • If a re-check 15-20 minutes later still results in a temperature over 100.4 then no one will be allowed out of the vehicle and the camper will not be allowed to attend camp.
    • Adults who drive their campers to camp be required and encouraged to:
      • Respect their assigned drop-off time and arrive as close to that time as possible.
      • Limit the amount of non-essential passengers travelling to camp (one adult driver and any number of campers is preferred)
      • Minimize the amount of time they take to say goodbye to increase the flow of traffic.
      • Say goodbye close to or inside their vehicles.
      • Always maintain a physical distance with other campers and parents.
      • Wear a cloth face mask if they exit their vehicle.
      • Never go in their child’s cabin or any other common camp building besides Bankson Lodge.
    • The lobby area of Bankson Lodge will be a designated area for parents only.
      • Parents may pay a balance or ask account-related questions at the front desk.
      • Parents may use the restrooms in the lobby.
      • We will have cookies and coffee available for parents.
    • Parent/guardians who might be at a higher health risk are encouraged to not come to camp and to have another trusted adult provide transportation for their child.

Camper Intake

  • Campers and parents must have filled out their pre-screening documents prior to arrival and have it available when they arrive on campus. No camper will be admitted to Miracle Camp unless they have a pre-screening form that is signed by a parent. This is the form that directs parents and campers to self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms and body temperature for the 14-days prior to their camp session starting.
    • This form also directs parents to call camp about 72 hours before their camp session is about to begin (Thursday) if they answer “yes” to any of the symptom or screening questions.
  • If campers are travelling up in a large group (such as a church bus or van), an initial health screening must take place in the church parking lot by a health professional. It is each church’s responsibility to coordinate this.
    • The entire form must be filled out and signed by the health professional and it must include every passenger on the vehicle, including the driver.
    • The form must be brought up to camp by the driver and turned in before any camper is allowed to get off the bus.
  • Campers will wash or sanitize their hands immediately upon arrival to their cabin.

 

Camper Pick-Up

  • Staff will be positioned at the entrance to give guidance as parents arrive.
  • Parents will be instructed to drive their car to the designated parking lot closest to their child’s cabin, and wait there for their camper to officially be dismissed.
  • Like camper drop-off, parents will be required and encouraged to:
    • Respect the standard pick-up time and arrive as close to that time as possible.
    • Limit the amount of non-essential passengers travelling to camp (one adult driver and any number of campers is preferred).
    • Minimize the amount of time they spend on campus to increase the flow of traffic.
    • Greet their child close to or inside their vehicles.
    • Always maintain a physical distance with other campers and parents.
    • Wear a cloth face mask if they exit their vehicle.
    • Never go in their child’s cabin or other common buildings.
  • The Bankson Lodge lobby will be a designated area for parents.
  • Parent/guardians who might be at a higher health risk are encouraged to not come to camp and to have another trusted adult provide transportation for their child.